Author: Ken Canfield, PhD

Anger & Priorities

Herb comes home from errands, and young Mark and Grace are eager to go outside and play. He shakes them loose from his arms and legs for a minute so he can change clothes, and he takes the mail upstairs with him. His five-year-old grandson follows, talking about what happened that day, overflowing with comments that draw from both reality and make-believe. It’s too much for Herb to follow. “Mark,” he says, “can’t you see that I’m trying to read the mail? Let’s talk about this later.” Back downstairs, Herb’s wife is nowhere to be found. So Herb fixes...

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Talking with Young Grandchildren

You can talk, but will they listen? Researchers say that “the amount of language directed to a child [is] perhaps the strongest indicator of later intellectual and linguistic and social development.”  Sounds great. But what about real life? Sometimes we grandparents can get pretty monosyllabic and ineffective. We say “Don’t do that,” “Pick up your toys,” “What’s the magic word?” We don’t want to communicate, we just want cooperation. Let’s look at some ways to increase the chances that your grandchild hears you and responds. First, give information more than thoughts or feelings. For example, instead of saying, “I’ve told...

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Write Notes to Your Grandchild’s Team

No argument, communication is the lifeblood of healthy relationships. But for some of us, sitting down and verbally pouring out statements of gratitude for other members of our grandchildren’s team would be awkward. But let’s look at an idea that’s probably less intimidating. Just a little bit of effort-a moment each day-can encourage parents, teachers, coaches, pastors, other grandparents, and anyone who is supporting your grandchildren. Bill Snyder has been the Head Football Coach at Kansas State University for many years. Several months ago, an article was published in ESPN that claimed that Coach Snyder takes time out of...

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